Glenshee Archaeology Project

Glenshee, in north-east Perth and Kinross, is a beautiful and distinctive landscape that is remarkably rich in archaeological remains – from prehistoric stone circles and burial cairns to Pictish longhouses, and the fermtouns and sheilings of the 19th century. The well-preserved archaeological remains have been neglected by academics and national agencies, and only lightly-touched by developer funded archaeology since the RCAHMS publication North-east Perth: an archaeological landscape highlighted its importance and value in the 1990’s.

The Glenshee Archaeology Project was developed by Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust and delivered in partnership with Northlight Heritage between 2012 and 2017. Through ‘citizen science’, the project aimed to address the neglected narrative of north-east Perth and Kinross, uncover the fascinating story of prehistoric and early historic life in Glenshee and share this with residents and visitors.

The initial thrust of the project was concerned with the so-called ‘Pitcarmick’ style buildings in the uplands around the glen and investigated several rare Pictish turf and stone longhouses dating to around 500-1000 AD. It also explored related features of the wider landscape, such as clearance cairns, trackways and boundaries.

Take A Virtual Tour of Lair, Glenshee

Clues in Names

The name Glen Shee comes from the Scottish gaelic word glean meaning ‘glen’ and sìth meaning ‘fairy people of the Other World’, sohence ‘Fairy glen or glen of peace’. As part of the project, a place-name survey was commissioned to try and unlock more of the history of the Glen and its people from the names of natural and man-made features in the landscape.

Find out more in the place-name report.

Clues in Names

The name Glen Shee comes from the Scottish gaelic word glean meaning ‘glen’ and sìth meaning ‘fairy people of the Other World’, sohence ‘Fairy glen or glen of peace’. As part of the project, a place-name survey was commissioned to try and unlock more of the history of the Glen and its people from the names of natural and man-made features in the landscape.

Find out more in the place-name report.

What are Pitcarmick-type Buildings?
Early Historic Turf Longhouses at Lair, Glenshee
Glenshee Timeline
Excavation Photos
Explore More in the Book

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